Categories
personal loan rate calculator

10 Loopholes to Build a Tiny Home Legally

10 Loopholes to Build a Tiny Home Legally

It’s no secret that tiny houses are growing in popularity across the U.S. Not only can owners of tiny homes simplify their lives by reducing possessions and space, but they also tend to pay less for mortgages, utilities, and other costs.

Still, zoning laws can make it hard for average Americans to find sites for their pint-sized properties. These guidelines affect the dimensional requirements for various types of buildings.

“I think that originally those laws were there to protect people, and then they grew to be more about keeping the neighborhoods standard and keeping property values high,” said Elaine Walker, founder of the American Tiny House Association. “But I think we’re seeing a bit of pullback on that idea.”

So, where exactly can tiny house enthusiasts put their little homes, and how can they comply with zoning laws that differ from place to place?

1. Build your tiny home in a friend’s backyard.

If land ownership isn’t your primary objective, consider building your tiny house on someone else’s lot as an accessory dwelling unit (ADU). According to the Federal Housing Administration, ADUs are habitable living units located on properties with single-family homes. So, if your friend or family member has land to spare, you could share it under ADU regulations in many states.